Vector 271

February 2, 2013

Artwork by Cecile Matthey

The latest mailing from the British Science Fiction Association contains Vector 271 and Focus 59.

The contents of Vector can be found here, except for the book review section which can be found here. I’ve reviewed Robert Jackson Bennet’s The Troupe for this issue.

The contents of Focus aren’t listed online so you might be interested to know that this issue is guest-edited by Keith Brooke and has articles by Kristine Kathyrn Rusch, Garry Kilworth, Michael Swanwick, Kim Lakin-Smith, Steven Savile, Linda Nagata, Lisa Tuttle, Jeff Noon and James Patrick Kelly. Pretty damned impressive, eh? Now go and see what’s in Vector. And then join the BSFA.


Interzone 238

January 15, 2012

Artwork by Ben Baldwin

Interzone 238 will be published in a couple of days. This issue’s Bookzone will have reviews of the following titles:

The Kingdom of Gods by N. K. Jemisin (reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller)

Lemistry: A Celebration of the Work of Stanislaw Lem, edited by Ra Page & Magda Raczyńska (reviewed by Andy Hedgecock)

White Tiger by Kylie Chan (reviewed by Lawrence Osborn)

Daylight on Iron Mountain by David Wingrove (reviewed by me)

The Cold Commands by Richard Morgan (reviewed by Paul F. Cockburn)

Kafkaesque: Stories Inspired by Franz Kafka, edited by John Kessel & James Patrick Kelly (reviewed by John Howard)

The Islanders by Christopher Priest (reviewed by Alan Fraser)

Manhatten In Reverse by Peter F. Hamilton (reviewed by Tony Lee)

In the Lion’s Mouth by Michael Flynn (reviewed by Paul Kincaid)

Songs of the Dying Earth, edited by George R.R. Martin & Gardner Dozois (reviewed by Ian Sales)

The Joy of Technology by Roy Gray (reviewed by Ian Hunter)

You can see what else will be in this issue on Ben’s cover but for a more detailed look (including  interior artwork, story samples and lists of the the films reviewed) go here.


Interzone 226

January 11, 2010

Artwork by Warwick Fraser-Coombe.

Clear a wall! This year all six covers are by Fraser Warwick-Coombe and they will join together to form one giant piece of art. The interior is full colour throughout and is mind-blowingly stunning, with more artwork from Ben Baldwin, Mark Paxton, Jim Burns and Daniel Bristow-Bailey. Am I biased? Yeah – but it doesn’t mean that I’m wrong. There is fiction from Jason Sanford, Tyler Keevil, Mercurio D. Rivera, Jay Lake, Rachel Swirsky and Stephen Gaskell, and non-fiction from David Langford, Tony Lee and Nick Lowe. There’s also an index for all the stories published last year because it’s time for the readers’ poll. Go on – show your favourite authors some love.

The BookZone this month reviews:

The Secret History of Science Fiction edited by James Patrick Kelly & John Kessel (reviewed by Andy Hedgecock)

Winter Song by Colin Harvey (reviewed by Paul F. Cockburn)

The Cardinal’s Blades by Pierre Pevel (reviewed by Ian Hunter)

The Battle of the Sun by Jeanette Winterson (reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller)

Brain Thief by Alexander Jablokov (reviewed by Ian Sales)

The Sad Tales of the Brothers Grossbart by Jesse Bullington (reviewed by Iain Emsley)

The New Space Opera 2 edited by Gardner Dozois & Jonathan Strahan (reviewed by Ian Sales)

Ars Memoriae by Beth Bernobich (reviewed by Peter Tennant)

Black and White by Jackie Kessler & Caitlin Kittredge (reviewed by Vikki Green)

Go here to sample some of the contents or to buy your copy or – better still – subscribe. And you can follow its adventures here.


Asimov’s Science Fiction 398

February 5, 2009

James Patrick Kelly says some very nice things about the Transmissions From Beyond podcasts in his column on electronic science fiction in the March issue of Asimov’s SF.

Transmissions From Beyond is an exiting new podcast from TTA Press with new stories appearing every Monday. Well, not exactly new, but new to podcast, The stories on Transmissions From Beyond are drawn from TTA Press’s three print magazines: SF and fantasy from Interzone, the UK’s longest running speculative fiction magazine; horror from Black Static; and crime from Crimewave. They are stories with an English accent, but they are without doubt some of the finest to be found on the web today.”


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