Interzone 249

November 24, 2013
Artwork by Jim Burns

Artwork by Jim Burns

Interzone 249 is available right now. Depending on your subscription, it will have mailed out with Black Static 37 and Crimewave 12. They’re all spectacular magazines. Follow the links for more information on the contents.

This issue is a bit of a John Shirley special. As well as fiction from John, we have Andy Hedgecock interviewing him about  New Taboos amongst other things.

The Book Zone also has reviews of:

Exit Kingdom by Alden Bell (reviewed by Maureen Kincaid Speller)

Swords of Good Men by Snorri Kristjansson (reviewed by Ian Sales)

21st Century SF edited by David G. Hartwell & Patrick Nielsen Hayden (reviewed by Jo L. Walton)

We See a Different Frontier edited by Fabio Fernandes & Djibril al-Ayad (reviewed by Jack Deighton)

Evening’s Empires by Paul McAuley (reviewed by Paul Kincaid)

The Violent Century by Lavie Tidhar (reviewed by Stephen Theaker)

Phoenix by S.F. Said (reviewed by Barbara Melville)

The Secret of Abdu El Yezdi by Mark Hodder (reviewed by Peter Loftus)

The Detainee by Peter Liney (reviewed by Simon Marshall-Jones)

Some Remarks by Neal Stephenson (reviewed by Paul F. Cockburn)

Shaman by Kim Stanley Robinson (reviewed by Duncan Lunan)

Hide Me Among the Graves by Tim Powers (reviewed by Lawrence Osborn)

The Diamond Deep by Brenda Cooper (reviewed by me)

And, of course, the latest installment of Jonathan McCalmont’s Future Interrupted.

 


Interzone 243

November 14, 2012

Artwork by Ben Baldwin

This issue should be out very, very soon; we’re talking days now. There will be fiction from Jon Wallace, Chen Qiufan (translated by Ken Liu), Priya Sharma, Jason Sanford and Caroline M. Yoachim; non-fiction columns from David Langford, Tony Lee and Nick Lowe; and artwork from Ben Baldwin, Richard Wagner, Martin Hanford and Warwick Fraser-Coombe. Go here for details and samples.

The Bookzone will feature:

Jack Glass by Adam Roberts (reviewed and interviewed by Paul Kincaid)

Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson (reviewed by me)

Blood and Feathers by Lou Morgan (reviewed by Paul F. Cockburn)

Empty Space by M. John Harrison (reviewed by Jack Deighton)

The Hydrogen Sonata by Iain M. Banks (reviewed by Lara Buckerton)

Some Kind of Fairy Tale by Graham Joyce (reviewed by Elaine Gallagher)

Sorry Please Thank You by Charles Yu (reviewed by me)

The Sphinx of the Ice Realm by Jules Verne (reviewed by Duncan Lunan)

The Fractal Prince by Hannu Rajaniemi (reviewed by Paul F. Cockburn)

The Wurms of Blearmouth by Steven Erikson (reviewed by Stephen Theaker)

Three Parts Dead by Max Gladstone (reviewed by Ian Sales)

 

 


Mirrorblink

October 14, 2012

Jason Sanford previews his story for an upcoming issue of Interzone.

There’s also a sample of Warwick Fraser-Coombe’s excellent artwork.


2012 Million Writers Award

March 30, 2012

Nominations are now open for the 2012 Million Writers Award. This is an award to recognise the best in online fiction.

Editors can find out how to nominate stories here and readers can find out how to nominate here.


Starship Sofa 223

February 2, 2012

The latest podcast from Tony C. Smith’s award-winning show  is a Jason Sanford special which includes a reading of Into The Depths of Illuminated Seas (first published in Interzone 226).


Locus 612

January 2, 2012

The January Locus sees Gardner Dozois reviewing no less than  three issues of Interzone.

“The strongest story in the July-August Interzone#235 is Mercurio D. Rivera’s For Love’s Delirium Haunts the Fractured Mind, another in the series that Rivera has been writing about the Wergen, aliens who have become obsessed with the ‘‘beauty’’ of humans [...]The only thing I didn’t like about the story was that the first-person narrator dies at the end of the story [...] Matthew Cook’s Insha’Allah [contains] some nice characterization, but could have been set in modern-day Iraq or Afghanistan with almost no changes necessary.  Al Robertson’ s Of Dawn is a moody and evocative fantasy about a grieving woman who encounters a Pan-like mythic figure in the remote English backcountry. [...]

“Another Wergen story by Rivera, Tethered,  features in the September/October Interzone, #236. This one examines the peculiar mating dynamics of the Wergen through the lens of a friendship between a young Wergen girl and a young human girl, a friendship doomed when the Wergen girl comes of age, and it manages to generate a strong emotional charge by the end. Jason Sanford’s The Ever-Dreaming Verdict of Plagues is another of his ‘‘plague birds’’ stories, set in a strange post-apocalyptic world; entertaining, but the backstory may be getting a little hard to follow by now for those unfamiliar with the earlier stories. [...] Stephen Kotowych’s A Time For Raven is a well-crafted near-fantasy with an almost subliminal fantasy element.

“The November/December Interzone, #237, is a strong issue after a couple of relatively weak ones. The best story here, and one of the strongest stories Interzone has published all year, is Digital Rites by Jim Hawkins, another story like All About Emily and Real Artists, about how human creativity is being supplanted, or at least intensively and intrusively ‘‘supplemented,’’ by artificial means, in this case a massive computer system that allows filmmakers to more or less experience a performance through the eyes of the actors, and subjectively control it. This is a vividly written and strongly characterized story, with a tense murder/espionage plot running through it: highly entertaining. I’d like to believe in the hopeful conclusion about human nature and the viewing audience that Hawkins comes to at the end, but, alas, I’m not sure that I do. Lavie Tidhar’s The Last Osama is also vividly written,  almost lurid, in fact, but somehow Tidhar is skilled enough to make the story work, although it takes us on a melodramatic journey into the Heart of Darkness through a world mystically transformed by the death of Osama Bin Laden into something like a weird Spaghetti Western. This is much too surreal to be considered legitimate science fiction, but, whatever it is, it’s a lot of fun, and will stick with you after you turn the last page.”

 

 

 

 


New Realms of Fantasy and Science Fiction July-August 2011

November 30, 2011

Jason Sanford’s Ships Like Clouds, Risen By Their Rain, which first appeared in Interzone 217, has been translated into Chinese and can be found in the July/August issue of New Realms of Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Or Ship Cloud Rainy, when translated back into English by Google.


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